African Politics and Policy

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Week in Review-3

The news from the third week of April are considerably more positive than the news we recorded for the previous weeks. Not all news were good of course, but media gave us many signs that there is reasonable ground for hope –which, in the end, is what Africa ultimately needs.

Apr. 16: launched new generation of country profiles (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5855 ), that highlight the challenges that some countries or regions experience (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5857 ) and the progress that some countries/ regions have made in terms of structural transformation of their economies (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5859).

Apr. 16: In Egypt a former Minister, who had embezzled 110 million US dollars, was sentenced to 7 years in jail (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5863).

Apr. 16: News media and agencies reported that Salva Kiir, President of South Sudan, was busy striking deals designed to revive the South Sudanese economy and to bring much needed foreign investments to the country  (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5865 ) .

Apr. 17: African women have beauty and brain. African media covered the success story of Tiguidanké Camara, who started her career as a fashion model, and eventually became an equally, if not more, successful business woman in the gold mining sector (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5871 ).

Apr. 17: it was announced that Conakry would be a World Book Capital in 2017 (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5876 ) and that Africa will play a key role in reviving the Maritime Silk Road (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5878 ).

Apr. 20: A top civil servant suicided in Zimbabwe (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5900 ), aid agencies reminded everyone that drought in Africa take a massive toll on GDP growth and quality of life (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5902 ), new reported that violence had killed 669 in Ethiopia in the course of the past few months (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5906 ), because of the escalation of tensions in the Upper Nile region of South Sudan aid agencies are pulling out their staff (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5908 ), Uganda withdrew its troops from Central African Republic (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5910 ), the IMF worries about the rapidly expanding public debt in Kenya (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5916 ), while everybody in East Africa worries about the army worms invasion that could destroy crops, undermine food security, make food prices rise, and stimulate inflation (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=5918 ).

riccardo pelizzo

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