The week brought a mixed bag of news.

The week started on May 23 with a series of bad news: the number of suicide bombing attacks in Nigeria and Cameroon was reportedly increasing (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6481) ; Kenya experienced a cholera outbreak (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6483) ; Uganda witnessed an escalation of crime (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6493) ; while in South Sudan rebel groups joined forces to oust President Salva Kiir (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6499).

On May 24, President Magufuli of Tanzania fired the Mining minister after an audit (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6517). This decisions was taken few days after Magufuli sacked more than 9000 civil servants. President Magufuli does not simply talk the good governance talk, but he also walks the good governance walk.

President Magufuli

May 27 brought  very positive and very negative news. The good news were that Ugandan banks were doing well (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6548 ) and that Tanzania and Uganda had reached a multi-billion dollar agreement to build oil pipelines which would contribute to the economic performance of the two countries (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6546).  But the media also reported rather disappointing news: the escalation of violence in Central African Republic is turning the cities into ghost towns (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6550) and Namibia is experiencing a rapid increase in the unemployment rate and an even more pronounced increase in youth unemployment (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6552).

May 28: Thew news of the day were really good: warring groups in South Sudan agreed to give peace a chance (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6554).

May 29: South Sudanese soldiers accused of rape and murder went on trial (http://www.africanpoliticsandpolicy.com/?p=6572).

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